‘Of course it’s suspicious’: 2 more Catholic churches burn in B.C.’s Southern Interior

Two more Catholic churches have burned in B.C.’s Southern Interior.

Chief of the Lower Similkameen Indian Band, Keith Crow, confirmed to Global News on Saturday morning that a church in the community of Hedley burned, as did one in the border community of Chopaka.

Hedley is about an hour’s drive southwest of Penticton, while Chopaka is about a half-hour west of Osoyoos.

Read more: 2 churches on reserve land destroyed by fire in South Okanagan

“I got a phone call early this morning from one of our members that our church was on fire down in Chopaka,” Crow told Global News.

“Upon that phone call, I got another phone call from the Upper Similkameen Indian Band that their church has also been burned.”

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The incident follows the burning of two other South Okanagan churches on reserve land early Monday.

Crow said he attended one scene this morning, and the church has been razed to the ground.

“It’s down to ash,” he said.

Click to play video: 'Evidence of an accelerant found at church fire scene in South Okanagan.' Evidence of an accelerant found at church fire scene in South Okanagan.

Evidence of an accelerant found at church fire scene in South Okanagan.

“Of course it’s suspicious,” Crow added when asked about the fire.

“Two fires again, two more churches in one night. I’m looking forward to seeing what they come up with.”

Asked about the community’s reaction to Saturday’s news, Crow called it heartbreaking.

“We still have people who worship and practice their religion. They had service there a couple of weeks ago,” said Crow.

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“I don’t condone this at all. I support all my members, regardless of their religion and what their beliefs are. I hope, in the long run, these individuals do get caught. This is unacceptable.”

Click to play video: 'Residential school survivor shares painful memories of childhood' Residential school survivor shares painful memories of childhood

Residential school survivor shares painful memories of childhood

Crow was also asked about links and possible anger at the Catholic church following the discovery of unmarked graves at former residential schools in Kamloops last month, and now this week in Saskatchewan.

“That’s where it all started,” Crow said. “It’s not news to us, the burials at Kamloops; we’ve always heard about it, we’ve always talked about it.

“I’m glad that they were finally uncovered. But on the other side, it is heartbreaking at the same time. The 215 who were found there . . . it’s devastating.”

Crow said his band’s records indicate there were a couple of LSIB members who did not return from the former residential school in Kamloops.

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“Honestly, I don’t know what to say. It’s heartbreaking,” said Crow. “And I do worry about the reaction of other communities across Canada who’ve had residential schools within their territory, within their nations.

“I think most communities have a small church and some people still practice, and I support them.”

Click to play video: 'Residential school discoveries highlight Canada’s long road to reconciliation' Residential school discoveries highlight Canada’s long road to reconciliation

Residential school discoveries highlight Canada’s long road to reconciliation

Crow said the church in Hedley burned around 3 a.m., while the one in Chopaka was closer to 4 a.m.

The burned churches came as Crow and other First Nations in the region planned on assembling in Kamloops on Saturday afternoon to honour residential school survivors and the unmarked graves.

It’s believed the assembly will include several First Nations and could reach well in excess of 100 people.

More to come…

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